How To Stop Bleeding Gums

If you brush your teeth and notice blood in the sink or on the toothbrush, you probably assume that your gums have been agitated by your brushing and the bleeding is a normal part of taking care of your oral health. At times, this may be the simple case, but if it happens frequently it’s a sign that your gums may not be as healthy as you think. 

What Causes Bleeding Gums? 

The presence of bacteria in a patient’s mouth can cause their gums to start bleeding. This bacteria feeds on food and sugar residue left over in your mouth after eating, and the bacteria’s waste left behind causes inflammation in the gums. When your gums are constantly irritated in this way, your immune system tries to fight the invading bacterial infection. 

A continuous cycle of this process leads to sustained inflammation, and this damage to the tissue of your gums themselves. Over time, in addition to bleeding gums, you will notice plaque and eventually tartar building up on your teeth at the gum line, which is a white, hard substance that requires professional cleaning to remove.

Come For A Dental Checkup

If your gums do bleed frequently, the first thing to do is to contact us for an exam. We’ll take a look at the health of your gums, take x-rays of your mouth, and by making a check-up a priority, we’ll be able to catch any concerns early and recommend necessary treatment, starting with a cleaning. We can also discuss ways you can add to or change your oral hygiene habits to help fight off the bacteria and ensure it has no room to collect again. 

Oral Hygiene At Home

Once you’re out of the office and home again, you’ll need to keep up with the plan you and your dentist put together. You may need to change your teeth brushing technique, as well as pick up a soft bristled brush to ensure you’re not doing harm to the sensitive gum tissue. 

Use a circular motion to brush your teeth, and use a pea sized blob of toothpaste on your brush. Bacteria lurks in all areas of the mouth, so including your tongue in your brushing routine, the roof of your mouth, and the insides of your cheeks, will help remove it.

Follow up with an anti-cavity mouthwash.

Reduce how much and how often you expose your teeth to harmful foods like sugar and soda. Bacteria flourishes on the sweet residue left behind on your teeth.

Schedule An Appointment Today!

Thankfully, here in Boston, we’re an experienced dental group that will consult with you and   show you how to stop your gums from bleeding, and lay all of your gum disease worries to rest. Be sure to schedule an appointment with us soon.

What Is A Dental Crown?

If you have a damaged or decayed tooth, your Boston dentist may recommend that you receive a “dental crown.” 

But what is a dental crown, exactly? And how can it help you restore your smile? 

What Is A Dental Crown? 

The crown is the part of your teeth that lies above the gumline. It is the section that you can see when you open your mouth. 

If you look closely at each tooth, you’ll see that it looks a little like a crown, with pieces of enamel spiking up around the edge. 

When dentists refer to a “dental crown,” however, they’re not usually referring to a natural crown. Instead, they typically mean a synthetic version – a man-made replacement that looks similar to the original. 

Boston dentists apply dental crowns in two ways. Either they fix them onto the original root of the tooth or thread them onto an artificial root implant. The purpose is to replace a natural crown that is either decayed or damaged in some other way. 

How Do Boston Dentists Place A Crown? 

We use the following process to install crowns in patients’ mouths: 

  • 1: X-ray. The first step is to x-ray the mouth to see the extent of damage to the tooth and whether any of the surrounding teeth require treatment. X-rays show both the crown of the tooth and the root beneath the gum line, giving the dentists a better view of the overall state of the teeth. 
  • 2: Numb The Tooth. The next step is to numb the teeth and gums before applying the crown with an anesthetic.
  • 3: Filing And Shaping The Tooth. To fit the new crown, your Boston dentist must file and shape the existing tooth. If the root is an implant post, then the dentist skips this stage. 
  • 4: Placing The Crown. Once the tooth is the right shape, the Boston dentist applies the crown. The crown is either cemented to the tooth or attached to the implanted post. 

How Long Does A Dental Crown Last? 

Crowns are a semi-permanent dental treatment, designed to return normal functionality to the mouth and teeth. Most last for upwards of fifteen years, if looked after correctly. 

It is not uncommon for crowns to last longer than that. Many people receive porcelain crowns that last twenty or even thirty years before requiring a replacement. 

How Do You Care For A Dental Crown? 

Unlike regular teeth, dental crowns do not decay. However, they still require regular maintenance, just like ordinary teeth. You should brush your dental crowns twice per day with fluoride toothpaste, paying particular attention to the area around the gum line. You should also be relatively gentle when you brush to protect the porcelain material as well as the rest of your teeth. 

Schedule An Appointment Today

Overall, porcelain crowns are one of the best ways to restore function to damaged or decayed teeth. If you are in need of a dental crown then schedule your first consultation today! We look forward to helping you improve your smile

What Is Zoom! Teeth Whitening?

Teeth whitening is the most common form of cosmetic dentistry by a considerable distance as millions of patients undergo professional treatments each year. There are several methods to complete the procedures, and Zoom! Teeth Whitening is an extremely effective solution.

What is Zoom! Teeth Whitening?

Zoom! treatments are a type of teeth whitening procedure that are completed through bleaching processes. Their aim is to restore the appearance of a naturally white smile by undoing the cosmetic impacts of enamel and dentin discoloration, which may have been caused from certain drinks (tea, coffee, red wine), smoking, or the signs of aging.

It is a highly popular treatment choice due to the high success rates, speed of treatment, instant results, and competitive pricing. While it is very safe for adults, it is not suitable for children under 13 due to bleaching agents and the fact that they are still developing.

How Are Zoom! Teeth Whitening Procedures Completed?

Zoom! Teeth Whitening treatments are completed in a single session, meaning that the entire procedure can be completed in just one hour. The bleaching can produce instant transformations, although it can take 48 hours for the peak results to show.

The treatment itself is completed in several stages:

  • Cleaning of the teeth to ensure all tooth surfaces are free from obstructions.
  • Preparations of the treatment area are completed to cover the gums but leave the teeth exposed, ensuring that the whitening agents only hit the tooth and do not damage the mouth.
  • A specialized Zoom! hydrogen peroxide whitening gel is applied to the teeth.
  • Your Boston dentist shines light from the specialized Zoom! Advanced Power Chairside Lamp onto the gels to activate the 25 percent hydrogen peroxide whitening, which breaks down the stains by allowing oxygen to enter the enamel and dentin.
  • Light treatment is used over three 15-minute sessions, giving a total treatment o 45 minutes. 
  • After the treatment, the dentist applies a gel to reduce sensitivity within the tooth.

The treatment does not alter the tooth structure in any shape or form.

Is Zoom! Tooth Whitening The Right Option?

Zoom! Tooth Whitening is a very popular treatment choice, but Dental Partners Of Boston are committed to ensuring all patients find the best solution for their individual needs. A comprehensive examination of the teeth and gums, alongside discussions about lifestyle and oral hygiene habits, as well as your budget, enables all patients to make a calculated decision.

It is also an opportunity for our Boston dentsts to investigate previous dental work such as crowns and veneers to confirm that Zoom! whitening is a suitable solution. Following the completion of the treatment, the use of a Zoom! home-use touch-up kit will ensure that the results are built to last. Aftercare additionally extends to tips on daily nutritional and hygiene habits. Schedule your Zoom! teeth whitening appointment today!

Which Condition Is The Earliest Stage of Periodontal Disease?

Periodontal disease, commonly known as gum disease, is a term that covers a range of conditions linked to inflammation of the tissues surrounding your teeth and is experienced by millions of people. This oral health condition can lead to serious issues including lost teeth and infections that spread to other parts of the body, but it isn’t one that surfaces overnight. Familiarizing yourself with the early signs is the most effective way to avoid the dangers that come with serious cases.

Gingivitis: The Earliest Stage of Periodontal Disease

The mildest form of gum disease is known as gingivitis, a condition that is believed to effect around one in two people at some stage in their lives. While the negative impacts are largely associated with one’s appearance, rather than pain, early cases can go unnoticed. Leaving the issue untreated will lead to severe cases of periodontitis. This is the stage where tooth loss and other major troubles can develop.

Gingivitis can affect anybody at any stage of life, but the likelihood can be elevated by several issues including;

  • Ethnicity
  • Pregnancy,
  • Diabetes
  • Smoking
  • Age
  • Reduced immunity
  • Poor nutrition
  • Some medication
  • Misaligned teeth
  • Problematic mouth appliances

While all of these issues, as well as hormonal changes, can play a role, the biggest culprit behind gingivitis is poor oral hygiene. When plaque isn’t effectively removed from the tooth surface, it hardens into tartar, which will inflame the gums  due to harmful bacteria and toxins. Infection will soon follow.

Gingivitis: Symptoms & Prevention

Periodontitis is likely to generate pain and discomfort, but gingivitis often goes undetected by sufferers due to a lack of those symptoms. Nonetheless, there are several key indicators that suggest the presence of gingivitis. They include;

  • Gum bleeding when brushing
  • Swollen gums
  • Redness of the gums
  • Gum tenderness
  • Mouth sores
  • Bad breath

Most of those issues can be associated with other conditions too. Nonetheless, gingivitis is one of the more common sources, which is why any of those symptoms should be seen as an incentive to seek treatment.

In the meantime, though, gingivitis can be prevented through good oral hygiene. This should involve brushing twice per day, flossing, and using mouthwash. Meanwhile, it’s imperative that you change your brushes (or brush heads) as soon as they show signs of requiring replacement. In tandem with good care at home, regular dental cleanings are important as well.

Gingivitis: Treatments

While naturally developing plaque can be removed through good oral hygiene practices, tartar will not be removed from tooth surfaces by home treatments. Therefore, it is essential to see a professional dental hygienist, who can remove all plaque and tartar through a process known as scaling.

The deep clean scaling can reverse the damage of gingivitis, but this needs to be followed by improved dental hygiene and the use of prescription toothpastes or mouthwashes, as well as visits to the dentist at least twice per year. In severe cases of gingivitis, several scaling appointments may be required to remove all of the tartar, particularly when multiple teeth are affected with deep calculus.

Gingivitis can return, though, which is why ongoing oral hygiene is essential for beating the early signs of periodontal disease.

Schedule An Appointment Today

If you have noticed early signs of gum disease, schedule an appointment to address the issue today. We look forward to helping you improve your smile

What Does LANAP Stand For?

Unfamiliar terminology is one of the primary sources of fear affecting millions of patients ahead of their proposed dental treatments, which is why familiarizing yourself with the latest terms is one of the most effective ways to settle the nerves and make smarter choices regarding potential dental work. LANAP is a term that you may have encountered before, but what is it?

What Does LANAP Stand For?

LANAP is a type of dental therapy that has been available since 1994, becoming increasingly accessible and advanced over the past 25 years. The acronym itself stands for Laser-Assisted New Attachment Procedure.

The surgical procedure is primarily used to treat periodontitis, focusing on restoration rather than resection. This treatment is commonly referred to as LAR (Laser-Assisted Regeneration) or LANAP-LAR. 

LANAP isn’t available to all sufferers of periodontitis, which is why a Periodontist needs to assess the situation to make the best recommendation for the patient’s particular situation. The majority of gum disease cases can now be treated with advanced LANAP processes.

Why LANAP Over Traditional Surgery?

LANAP has become a popular treatment choice for many reasons, not only because the treatments have become more accessible and affordable over the years. Other incentives for considering LANAP include:

  • LANAP does not require scalpel, sutures, or cutting the gums to reduce the pocket-size of the affected gums and jawbone. As such, the gum line is less likely to be compromised by recession.
  • LANAP is shown to be less painful than traditional surgery due to the use of lasers and without the need to cut the gums. Aside from reduced discomfort, this can put a patient’s mind at ease.
  • LANAP treatments are rarely followed by medication while the selective removal of tissue also means there is less tissue to heal. Patients are back to their best in no time.
  • LANAP protocols allow Periodontists to make far more accurate predictions about the outcomes due to the highly advanced technologies and ultra-accurate procedures.
  • LANAP produces long-term results, restoring function and appearances for the patient through regeneration processes that will last a lifetime. It can also save teeth that may not have been savable in the past.

How LANAP Works

LANAP treatments are FDA-cleared, allowing you to feel assured the procedure is safe and will provide optimal results. It encourages true periodontal regeneration through new bone growth and tissue reattachments. To do this, it uses a specialized PerioLase MVP-7 laser, which has seven settings to target the inflamed gums without causing damage to healthy gum tissues. It also enables the body to recover naturally. 

Gums can become restored and regenerated by removing the unhealthy tissues, which will subsequently allow new healthy tissues to grow. When followed by the right oral hygiene and aftercare, patients can reap the rewards for an entire lifetime. 

Schedule An Appointment Today

Our Boston Periodontist Sergio A. Guzman D.M.D., M.S.D. and the rest of the team at Dental Partners of Boston provide LANAP treatments along with a range of other dental procedures and invite patients suffering from periodontal disease to arrange a consultation today.  Schedule your consultation today!

How Long Does It Take The Hole To Close After A Tooth Extraction?

Adult teeth are designed to last you through your entire adult life. Unfortunately, for some, there are instances where a tooth needs to be extracted. 

Although the extraction of a tooth is generally the last thing we want to do, sometimes, it’s unavoidable. When a tooth is extracted, there is a space in place of what was once your tooth, and in that space, a small hole.

The amount of time required for this hole to heal depends on a few factors. We are going to look at how long it takes for some of these holes to close.

What Types of Extraction Are There?

At Dental Partners of Boston, we perform two types of extractions:

  • Simple Extraction – This is one of the most common extraction procedures. This extraction is generally performed on the canines, incisors, premolars, first and second molars.
  • Surgical Extraction – The surgical extraction is generally done for teeth that are securely trapped in the jawbone, like wisdom teeth

How Long Does The Healing Process Take?

When it comes to the amount of time required for a hole to heal completely depends on a number of factors. These can include the type of extraction, size of the tooth, and difficulty of extraction.

A Small Tooth

If the extracted tooth is a small tooth or a tooth with only a single root, the hole will close relatively quickly. A single root tooth should begin to heal by the end of the first week. You may find, by the second week, you should be able to eat more comfortably without fear of food entering the crevice.

A Larger Tooth

If the removal required the extraction of a larger tooth or a tooth with more than a single root, the healing time will be slightly longer. A larger, multiple rooted tooth extraction holes will start to heal at around the third week. One thing that should be noted is that the hole may still feel prominent for a few months after the procedure.

Wisdom Tooth

The wisdom tooth is an impacted tooth, so the healing time of this hole will always be slightly longer. The difference with the healing of a wisdom tooth is that it’s not just the healing of gum tissue. The wisdom tooth extraction also means your jawbone has to heal as well. Healing time after the removal of an impacted tooth is generally around six weeks.  

What To Pay Attention To

There are certain factors that can delay the healing process of any extraction hole. These include:

  • Smoking
  • Certain Medications
  • Blood Thinners

All of these can cause an increase in healing times.

Schedule An Appointment Today

If you have any questions or concerns when it comes to healing times, or if you need to see if a tooth might have to be extracted then contact Dental Partners of Boston where we will be happy to help! You also can schedule an appointment online as well. We are on hand to help with any of your dental needs. We look forward to helping you improve your smile!  

 

What is Endodontics?

As is the case with any other field of healthcare, dentistry can be split into many different categories. Endodontics is a specialty that only 3% of professional dentists are qualified in. but what does an endodontist actually do, and how can endodontics support you in the bid to gain greater control of your oral health?

What is endodontics?

Endodontics is a specialty that only 3% of professional dentists are qualified in. It focuses on the successful diagnosis and treatment of tooth pain. In many cases, it will cover root canal treatments alongside other practices to save severely damaged teeth that would ordinarily need to be removed. 

Treatments under the umbrella of endodontics use cutting-edge technologies and advanced equipment such as specialized dental microscopes to save teeth. Digital radiographs and 3-D imaging can be used to support strategic planning while dental dams can be used to protect the adjacent teeth and other parts of the mouth.

What separates an endodontist from a normal dentist?

Endodontists are dentists too, but rather than taking a generic approach to dentistry, they specialize in pain diagnoses and treatments. The main difference between them and other professionals, is that they have completed a minimum of two years extra training and education on top of what is required of a generic dentist.

This type of specialist also boasts excellent precision while a deeper understanding of pain management allows them to complete exact and complicated procedures. In addition to pain management during the treatment itself, their support extends to the healing processes to stop infection and inflammation.

As specialists in their field, endodontists can complete over 100 root canal treatments each month, enabling them to provide the very best care. For restorative works that target the appearance and function of severely damaged teeth, their work is truly special.

When are endodontics needed?

Endodontics do not cover general dentistry tasks such as cleaning, scaling, and fillings. They are focused almost exclusively on root canal treatments, which is why you may still need to visit a general dentist to keep your oral health in great condition.

However, there are several warning signs and symptoms that suggest an endodontist will be required to get your teeth back to full health. The most common issues are:

  • Tooth pain
  • General discomfort
  • Sensitivity to cold or hot liquids
  • Tooth injuries
  • Tenderness when chewing
  • Inflammation and gum tenderness

If any of those issues surface, it’s likely that endodontics will be the most suitable solution for you. Crucially, you need to act quickly to prevent further damage, get quick pain relief, and put yourself in the best position to gain long-term comfort.

To find out more and book your appointment today, please give us a call.

What is the difference between plaque and calculus?

Plaque and calculus are two terms that you’ll have almost certainly encountered when talking about oral health and general dentistry. Despite the fact that they are both related to the growth of bacteria on the teeth, using the two terms interchangeably isn’t quite accurate.

So, what is the difference between plaque and calculus? Here’s all you need to know.

What is plaque?

Plaque is a colorless film of bacteria and sugars that constantly forms on your teeth. While you cannot see plaque with the naked eye, you can often feel significant build-ups by running your tongue across the surface of your teeth due to its sticky properties.

While the small amounts of plaque that develops over the course of a few hours is nothing to worry about, plaque does grow very quickly and produces enough acid over time that it can be quite harmful. This is the number one cause of cavities and gum disease (including gingivitis), periodontal disease, and tooth loss.

The irritations caused by acidic bacteria can lead to inflammation and swelling, which is ultimately what leads to the surfacing of the conditions above. Therefore, maintaining control over plaque is absolutely crucial.

What is calculus?

Calculus, also known as tartar, is a hardened plaque. When plaque isn’t effectively removed from the tooth surface during your oral hygiene routine, minerals from your saliva will combine with the plaque to develop tartar. Unlike plaque, tartar cannot be brushed away.

The deposits of dental calculus will create stains on the teeth, usually along the gum line, will also put you at greater risk of cavities and more severe oral health issues. Given that calculus cannot be removed with ease at home, it is recommended that you come in for a professional cleaning at least twice a year.

Calculus is more visible, and impacts of it are easy to see. The rate at which plaque develops into tartar can vary greatly from one person to the next, which is why you must pay close attention to your personal situation.

How to control plaque and calculus

Given that plaque and bacteria constantly form on your teeth, it is impossible to prevent plaque entirely. However, there are several steps that can be taken to stay on top of the situation and stop plaque from growing and hardening.

Most of the steps revolve around good daily oral hygiene habits. Focus on the following elements for success:

  • Brush thoroughly twice per day,
  • Floss daily between the teeth
  • Change your diet to limit sugary foods

While taking these steps should control plaque, you are still likely to see some build-up. If you notice discoloration and other signs of dental calculus, give us a call for a cleaning. 

Even if you do not see signs of calculus, it’s worth visiting the dentist every six months to stay on top of your dental health. To book your appointment today, please give us a call.

How to Remove Calculus from Teeth

To prevent the buildup of tartar, otherwise known as calculus, it is vital to brush, floss and rinse using an antiseptic mouthwash. In this blog post, we are going to reveal everything you need to know about tartar, including what it is and how to remove it. 

What Is Tartar?

No matter how well you take care of your teeth, you are still going to have bacteria in your mouth. Bacteria mixes with food byproducts and proteins in order to form dental plaque, which is a sticky film. This gunk sticks to fillings and other dental work, as well as getting under your gum line and coating your teeth. The bacteria within the plaque can cause tooth enamel damage, resulting in cavities. However, if plaque is removed regularly, you can stop gum disease and stop tooth decay from happening. If plaque stays on your teeth and hardens into tartar, this is when bigger problems happen. This forms above and below the gum line. It is porous and rough and it can cause gum disease and receding gums. Dentists use specialist tools to remove it. 

How Does Tartar Affect Teeth and Gums?

A build-up of tartar on your teeth can make it difficult for flossing and brushing to be as effective as possible. When bacteria is left behind, you are at risk of developing tooth decay and cavities. Any calculus that forms under your gum line can be detrimental. This is because of the bacteria, which causes irritation and damage to the gums. Tartar can lead to gingivitis, the mildest form of gum disease, and can lead to progressive gum disease as time goes on.

Tips to Help Control Tartar

There are a number of different steps you can take to try and get tartar under control. The first thing you need to do is to make sure you thoroughly brush your teeth on a regular basis. You should brush for two minutes a time, twice a day. Using a brush with soft bristles is advisable. There have also been studies that have shown that powered or electric toothbrushes can help to remove plaque more effectively than manual models.

It is also important to use tartar-control toothpaste with fluoride. Fluoride is important because it helps with repairing damage to the enamel. There are some kinds of toothpaste that also have triclosan. This is a substance that can fight the bacteria found in plaque, so it’s a beneficial ingredient to look for when selecting a toothpaste.

It’s also a good idea to be cautious in terms of what you eat. The bacteria in your mouth will thrive on foods that are starchy and sugary. Harmful acids are released when they are exposed to these foods. Limit the number of sugary foods you expose your teeth to..

Please contact us today for an appointment for a cleaning and exam if you need help with tartar control

Emergency Dental Near Me in Boston

Dental emergencies can be stressful and can be very painful, but with the right partners in treatment, you can address them calmly and quickly. The sooner you can act, the better your chances of preventing more serious issues and the more likely you are to keep your tooth. As such, it’s wise to have a team like the Dental Partners of Boston that you can call up when you need them in an emergency.

When Do I Need Emergency Dental Care?

If you believe you are unsure if the situation is an emergency, your first course of action should be to give us a call so we can give you guidance and advice about your next steps. We may recommend that you come into the office for immediate treatment. Some cases may call for an emergency room visit.

Conditions That May Constitute A Dental Emergency

Though we can’t diagnose what you are facing until you get in, here are some symptoms you should take notice of and get in touch with us immediately if you experience them:

  • If your jaw is swollen
  • If you have an abscess in your mouth
  • If your gums are bleeding or aching
  • If you have suffered from physical trauma and your tooth feels painful after
  • If you can taste metal in your mouth
  • If your tooth has gone numb after you have experienced a toothache 
  • If you have a loose tooth
  • If you have regular non-stress related headaches

The symptoms above can be signs of serious tooth infections, gum infections, risks of tooth loss, and other serious issues that should be treated as emergencies. If you experience any of these, don’t hesitate to look for emergency dental near you.

What Is Emergency Dental Care?

Emergency dental care covers a range of treatments that are used to restore your oral health as quickly as possible and to ensure that no further harm or complications arise from emergency situations. For instance, in the case of tooth loss or damage, we can offer tooth reattachment treatments that bond the broken or lost tooth back into place, allowing them to heal back in place naturally. It can also include the use of antibiotics to ensure that severe infections are stopped.

If You Think That You’re Experiencing A Dental Emergency, Don’t Wait!

Whether you’ve injured yourself and you believe your teeth have been affected, you experience any of the symptoms above, or even if you don’t but you’re still worried about your oral health, don’t hesitate to get in touch with emergency dental near you. Dental Partners of Boston will be here no matter the time to protect your oral health when you need us the most. Contact us immediately if you are experiencing a dental emergency!